Manuscript March: If My Thesis Were a… Viral Video!

It’s Friday. I don’t know about you, but I need a break from all the waking and writing and intellectualising that I’ve been doing all week. (Um… I read a book and wrote a half-paragraph about it. Which I’ll probably delete. But that doesn’t change the fact that it’s Friday.)

In today’s edition of IMTWA, we’re looking at viral videos.

Ah, YouTube. Bastion of time-wasting, enabler of procrastination, home of the internet’s cutest animals and most offensive commenters. I will now commence to transparently connect my thesis to various YouTube viral videos, in a thinly-veiled attempt to justify our watching them during a workday. (By the way: if you can’t see videos embedded below, click the header above to view this post in full.)

OK, starting with a classic. My thesis is clearly the Star Wars kid. It’s nerdy, it’s not fully mature yet, and it uses materials in ways they weren’t intended to be used.

 

Or possibly, my thesis is the Evolution of Dance video. It purports to contextualise modern trends by demonstrating their precedents, but ends up pretty much entirely focused on historical content.

 

No. I’ve got it. My thesis is the dramatic chipmunk. It’s been looked at 43 million times, and it’s still a bit dubious.

 

What am I talking about? My thesis must be Charlie Bit My Finger

Nope, sorry, rickroll! Because I’m never gonna give [my research] up, never gonna let [my supervisor] down, never gonna turn around [from my computer in the forseeable future.]

Your turn: if your thesis were a viral video, which would it be?

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About Anaise Irvine

Dr Anaise Irvine is the Editor of Thesislink. She has a research background in science and narrative. Her PhD research analysed how contemporary films and novels represent genetic engineering as a social justice issue. She has previously researched fictional representations of evolution and quantum mechanics. She has taught such diverse texts as Blade Runner and Bridget Jones’s Diary, and her most obscure skill is being able to turn novels into phylogenetic trees!

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